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TNC Stiltgrass Press Release

For Immediate Release                                                                       

August 15, 2011      

Contact: Liz Loucks, The Nature Conservancy in MA,                              eloucks@tnc.org, 508-693-6287, ex. 15
                                                                       

Volunteers Needed to Battle Japanese Stiltgrass
Invasive Plant Threatens Native Species

 

WEST TISBURY, MA – Japanese stiltgrass has recently been discovered in the Longview neighborhood of West Tisbury, and The Nature Conservancy needs your help in keeping this invasive species under control.

 

The harmful grass, which was introduced to the United States from Asia as a natural packaging material at the beginning of the 19th century can crowd out native wildflowers, grasses, and tree seedlings.

 

Stiltgrass seeds are easily spread along roads and into shady lawns by vehicles and garden equipment, and The Nature Conservancy is making an effort to educate local homeowners, gardeners and professional landscapers about the risks it poses.

 

Please report any Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum) sightings to the Conservancy’s office in Vineyard Haven, and consider coming out to help us remove Japanese stiltgrass from near our Hoft Farm Field Station Preserve. Luckily, stiltgrass has shallow roots and can easily be removed, though gardeners should take care with disposal to avoid unintentionally spreading the seeds.

 

WHERE: Hoft Farm Field Station, 74 Lambert’s Cove Rd, West Tisbury, MA. Parking is available on site.

 

WHEN: 9:30 am – 12 pm, Saturday, August 27

 

TO VOLUNTEER: Contact Liz Loucks for more information or directions. Dress for gardening, and bring gloves and drinking water.

 

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The Nature Conservancy is the leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.  To date, the Conservancy and its more than one million members have been responsible for the protection of more than 18 million acres in the United States and have helped preserve more than 117 million acres in Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific. Visit The Nature Conservancy on the Web at www.nature.org/massachusetts

 

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Jeremy Houser,
Aug 15, 2011, 10:46 AM
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Jeremy Houser,
Aug 15, 2011, 10:47 AM
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Jeremy Houser,
Aug 15, 2011, 10:47 AM
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